»→  Minimax Theme Demo Blog

minimaxtheme:

Hey there! This blog demoes Minimax, a minimalist Tumblr theme with a maximalist number of features and options. Features include:

  • All post types
  • Custom colors for all elements
  • Custom background image
  • High-res photos
  • Localization (100% English and German, 80% other languages)
  • Tags, notes, exif data, play count, post author, reblog source, and content source on permalink pages
  • Search
  • Day pages, Tag pages, and Search result pages
  • Newer/Older links on permalink and day pages
  • Simple, minimal, and responsive design (resize your browser window to try it)
  • optional Infinite Scrolling
  • optional Google Analytics integration
  • optional Disqus comments
  • Successfully tested in Google Chrome 35+, Safari 7+, Internet Explorer 9+, and Mozilla Firefox 19+
  • Valid semantic HTML5 markup (that is, if you exclude the stuff Tumblr inserts into the page after processing the theme)
  • Source code licensed under the MIT license and available on GitHub

So I spent this weekend building a Tumblr theme. That’s what the cool kids do these days, right?

Minimax is quite minimalist in terms of design, being based on the theme I’m currently using on Aufgelöst, which only supports full-width photo posts. My goal was to add support for the other post types and release the result to the Theme Garden - but I kinda shot past that with Minimax: it provides pretty much every feature a Tumblr theme can provide, while being largely customizable (and, along with my other themes, free software).

I’m rather proud of this one and hope that the “APPROVAL PENDING" badge disappears quickly.

Here’s a few unsorted thoughts on Her (no unmarked spoilers), mostly because they don’t fit into 140 characters and App.net never really took off, did it?:
The acting’s pretty good, I guess. (It helps that there’s some actual depth to the characters.)
Voice acting especially. (I could totally image Scarlett Johansson’s voice being on, like, This American Life, or any other NPR-y podcast.)
I watched Restless yesterday and complained about the instagrammy color grading. This holds true for Her as well, but (to me) it’s less annoying here, maybe because it’s set in the future?
Orange-blue contrast, we meet again:

Good architecture. And, more generally, some of the shots are beautifully minimalist:






Especially this one. Ridiculously not subtle at all, and I love it:

I can’t into emotion-y things in movies, so that was kinda meh and it’s why I’m not really commenting on any of the story-related bits. YMMV, etc.
The pace was okay, contrary to most films these days (get off my lawn already), but things felt a bit redundant at times. See the previous point.
Chris Pratt. (His role was too large for me to not be annoyed by the fact that he’s 100% Andy Dwyer in my brain, but small and spread out enough to not temporarily un-typecast him for me.)

Spoilers: I wish the movie had explained the tech and how it was accepted by society the way it seems to have been accepted. How did this AI and voice synthesis evolve, who developed it, who does it belong to, how did people become okay with technology being sentinent, how do the AIs network and collaborate, where are the AIs going, etc.? But obviously Her isn’t that kind of movie.
I don’t know if this is particularly unusual, but there’s some Chinese on this exit sign. Interesting detail, with the movie being set in the future and all.

Her is a decent enough movie, I think, and you should probably watch it, and then go listen to the latest Hello Internet episode for more opinions—that’s what I’m going to do, at least.
Update (2014-07-26): A few points I forgot to mention yesterday:
I like the way colored objects are used, especially in the office Theodore works at and in his apartment.
The score’s good and fits the movie quite well.
What’s interesting to me is that Theodore’s job, which today probably wouldn’t pay so well, buys him this nice big empty apartment in the city and ample amounts of free time. Seems like Her is set in a mostly post-scarcity world.

Here’s a few unsorted thoughts on Her (no unmarked spoilers), mostly because they don’t fit into 140 characters and App.net never really took off, did it?:

  • The acting’s pretty good, I guess. (It helps that there’s some actual depth to the characters.)
  • Voice acting especially. (I could totally image Scarlett Johansson’s voice being on, like, This American Life, or any other NPR-y podcast.)
  • I watched Restless yesterday and complained about the instagrammy color grading. This holds true for Her as well, but (to me) it’s less annoying here, maybe because it’s set in the future?
  • Orange-blue contrast, we meet again:

  • Good architecture. And, more generally, some of the shots are beautifully minimalist:

  • Especially this one. Ridiculously not subtle at all, and I love it:

  • I can’t into emotion-y things in movies, so that was kinda meh and it’s why I’m not really commenting on any of the story-related bits. YMMV, etc.
  • The pace was okay, contrary to most films these days (get off my lawn already), but things felt a bit redundant at times. See the previous point.
  • Chris Pratt. (His role was too large for me to not be annoyed by the fact that he’s 100% Andy Dwyer in my brain, but small and spread out enough to not temporarily un-typecast him for me.)

  • Spoilers: I wish the movie had explained the tech and how it was accepted by society the way it seems to have been accepted. How did this AI and voice synthesis evolve, who developed it, who does it belong to, how did people become okay with technology being sentinent, how do the AIs network and collaborate, where are the AIs going, etc.? But obviously Her isn’t that kind of movie.
  • I don’t know if this is particularly unusual, but there’s some Chinese on this exit sign. Interesting detail, with the movie being set in the future and all.

Her is a decent enough movie, I think, and you should probably watch it, and then go listen to the latest Hello Internet episode for more opinions—that’s what I’m going to do, at least.

Update (2014-07-26): A few points I forgot to mention yesterday:

  • I like the way colored objects are used, especially in the office Theodore works at and in his apartment.
  • The score’s good and fits the movie quite well.
  • What’s interesting to me is that Theodore’s job, which today probably wouldn’t pay so well, buys him this nice big empty apartment in the city and ample amounts of free time. Seems like Her is set in a mostly post-scarcity world.
Here’s a blurry star trail, surrounded by way too many hot pixels.
(Never mind the shakiness - for this 30s test exposure, my camera was mounted on a less-than-steady tripod standing on a similarly unsuitable desk, and this was shot through a 500mm lens, essentially maximizing any accidental movements.)

Here’s a blurry star trail, surrounded by way too many hot pixels.

(Never mind the shakiness - for this 30s test exposure, my camera was mounted on a less-than-steady tripod standing on a similarly unsuitable desk, and this was shot through a 500mm lens, essentially maximizing any accidental movements.)

It’s not easy to take macro photographs of waves without
drowning your camera
or your shoes
while getting usable images with straight horizons.

It’s not easy to take macro photographs of waves without

  1. drowning your camera
  2. or your shoes
  3. while getting usable images with straight horizons.
I released two Tumblr themes recently, by which I mean “sometime this decade, but I couldn’t be bothered to write about them up until now”.
I consider Guillemets to be quite ugly now, to be honest. But back when I created it, I wanted to try the whole releasing-a-theme thing, so I just whipped up a simple one. It’s decent, I guess, but it isn’t going to look particularly great on very small or large displays.
GreyGray is 100% gray, or grey if you think that’s the correct spelling. (Either way, it’s not called GIF, so the internet won’t pointlessly fight about it.) It’s wider than Guillemets, horizontally centered, features large margins, and generally looks quite nice. Right now, I’m using it for this very blog, so you’re basically looking at a demo right now.

Both themes are easily customizable - you can change every single color in the appearance options. So go ahead, try them, customize them, and build things on top of them! (Also, send me a link maybe?)

I released two Tumblr themes recently, by which I mean “sometime this decade, but I couldn’t be bothered to write about them up until now”.

I consider Guillemets to be quite ugly now, to be honest. But back when I created it, I wanted to try the whole releasing-a-theme thing, so I just whipped up a simple one. It’s decent, I guess, but it isn’t going to look particularly great on very small or large displays.

GreyGray is 100% gray, or grey if you think that’s the correct spelling. (Either way, it’s not called GIF, so the internet won’t pointlessly fight about it.) It’s wider than Guillemets, horizontally centered, features large margins, and generally looks quite nice. Right now, I’m using it for this very blog, so you’re basically looking at a demo right now.

Both themes are easily customizable - you can change every single color in the appearance options. So go ahead, try them, customize them, and build things on top of them! (Also, send me a link maybe?)

I’ve purchased a Nifty MiniDrive Air a few months back, shortly after I bought my MacBook Air. It arrived a month or three later, but that’s to be expected about products funded with Kickstarter.
I was lucky as I didn’t have to use tape to make it work - it just worked, out of the box, exactly as you’d expect it to work. Transfer speeds are great (or not so great, completely depending on your Micro SD card - don’t expect SSD performance), it sits flush, and the surface looks exactly like the MacBook’s aluminium.
After finding out that Time Machine refuses to backup SD cards for no good reason, I decided to use my Nifty MiniDrive to store movies and TV shows I’m going to watch soon - the read speed ist fast enough for anything my MacBook can decode without stuttering, there’s no point in putting large files that I almost never use on the internal SSD, and all of my movies and TV episodes are already backed up on at least two external drives.

I’ve purchased a Nifty MiniDrive Air a few months back, shortly after I bought my MacBook Air. It arrived a month or three later, but that’s to be expected about products funded with Kickstarter.

I was lucky as I didn’t have to use tape to make it work - it just worked, out of the box, exactly as you’d expect it to work. Transfer speeds are great (or not so great, completely depending on your Micro SD card - don’t expect SSD performance), it sits flush, and the surface looks exactly like the MacBook’s aluminium.

After finding out that Time Machine refuses to backup SD cards for no good reason, I decided to use my Nifty MiniDrive to store movies and TV shows I’m going to watch soon - the read speed ist fast enough for anything my MacBook can decode without stuttering, there’s no point in putting large files that I almost never use on the internal SSD, and all of my movies and TV episodes are already backed up on at least two external drives.

Remember when I promised to update my photo blog more regularly?
Yeah, me neither. But yesterday, after finally editing all publishable photos I took in Denmark last summer, dumping the 15 GB worth of PSDs on a few external hard drives and dealing with a broken file system, I decided to begin putting those photos on Tumblr to acquire some meaningless internet points.
Also, on a completely unrelated note, I created ReAD a few weeks back. It’s quite nifty, if I may say so myself (which I may, because this is my blog).

Remember when I promised to update my photo blog more regularly?

Yeah, me neither. But yesterday, after finally editing all publishable photos I took in Denmark last summer, dumping the 15 GB worth of PSDs on a few external hard drives and dealing with a broken file system, I decided to begin putting those photos on Tumblr to acquire some meaningless internet points.

Also, on a completely unrelated note, I created ReAD a few weeks back. It’s quite nifty, if I may say so myself (which I may, because this is my blog).

I hear it’s hip to post one’s desk once in a while.
I took this photo a couple of days ago, when I was (supposed to be) working on a fairly easy web development assignment for a course whose name translates to “Digital Media Design”. (It’s not math, so it’s bound to be fairly easy.)

I hear it’s hip to post one’s desk once in a while.

I took this photo a couple of days ago, when I was (supposed to be) working on a fairly easy web development assignment for a course whose name translates to “Digital Media Design”. (It’s not math, so it’s bound to be fairly easy.)