Neon Dust

Apple hat im letzten Quartal 4,76 iPhones pro Sekunde verkauft.

Gestern hat Apple die Quartalszahlen bekanntgegeben: Umsatz 46,33 Milliarden Dollar, Gewinn 13,06 Milliarden. Pro Dollar Umsatz hat Apple also gut 28 Cent Gewinn gemacht. Vor einem Jahr noch waren es “nur” 26,74 Milliarden Umsatz und 6 Milliarden Dollar Gewinn, also etwa 22,4 Cent Gewinn pro eingenommenem Dollar.

Apple hat im vergangenen Quartal 15,4 Millionen iPods, 17 Millionen iPads, 1,2 Millionen iMacs, 2,9 Millionen MacBooks und 37 Millionen iPhones verkauft. Interessant finde ich dabei zwei Punkte: 1. Leute kaufen ernsthaft noch iPods, und 2. Apple hat nur 3,1 Millionen herkömmliche Computer verkauft, während das amerikanische Unternehmen knapp 70 Millionen iP-Devices an den Mann gebracht hat. Auf jedes verkaufte Gerät, dass es zur Jahrtausendwende im Prinzip schon gab, kommen also fast 23 neuartige Geräte. Selbst wenn man nur die neueste Geräteklasse - das Tablet - nimmt, sind pro normalem Computer 5,5 Tablets verkauft worden - nicht schlecht für ein Produkt, dass vor ziemlich genau zwei Jahren vorgestellt wurde.

Ich selbst besitze genau ein Produkt “Designed in California”: einen roten iPod shuffle G2.

(via Caschys Blog, 512 Pixels)

Mehr Boom Boom Boom Boom Boom Boom gibt es hier bei TechCrunch.

“The genius in his labyrinth. Jobs in his home office in December 2004, the last time Walker ever photographed him.”
Diana Walker:

I first met Steve Jobs on a photo shoot for TIME in 1982. I had no idea that he was going to be my friend or that he was going to be this incredible genius — a part of all our lives, in what we do and what we see. He was speaking to a group of Stanford students in a dorm living room, and it was hard to photograph him there and not be in the way. You had to have light, and I was creeping around. But he was game. I asked him to stand on top of an Apple sign, and he did it. I asked him to stand in front of an Apple cutout (which ended up on the cover of Fortune magazine), and he did that too. I thought, This is you. This is who you are.
He was so much fun because he was so quick — he was such a fast study. You showed him anything and he could get it in a second. I was always fascinated by his design sense. It was wonderful because he liked my pictures.
I really will miss his inventiveness, his ideas, his eyes — and how bright he was all over. He had some kind of electricity about him. He was very, very focused in the office. He demanded a lot of the people who worked for him. I’m sure Steve wasn’t the easiest person to work for, but what a fascinating person to work for.

Great photography, great text. The photos look even better in the printed version of that article which appeared in TIME Europe’s October 17 issue.
(via 512 Pixels)
Note: I wouldn’t call this a “Minimalist Workspace” as Stephen Hackett did. This is what minimalist workspaces look like.

The genius in his labyrinth. Jobs in his home office in December 2004, the last time Walker ever photographed him.”

Diana Walker:

I first met Steve Jobs on a photo shoot for TIME in 1982. I had no idea that he was going to be my friend or that he was going to be this incredible genius — a part of all our lives, in what we do and what we see. He was speaking to a group of Stanford students in a dorm living room, and it was hard to photograph him there and not be in the way. You had to have light, and I was creeping around. But he was game. I asked him to stand on top of an Apple sign, and he did it. I asked him to stand in front of an Apple cutout (which ended up on the cover of Fortune magazine), and he did that too. I thought, This is you. This is who you are.

He was so much fun because he was so quick — he was such a fast study. You showed him anything and he could get it in a second. I was always fascinated by his design sense. It was wonderful because he liked my pictures.

I really will miss his inventiveness, his ideas, his eyes — and how bright he was all over. He had some kind of electricity about him. He was very, very focused in the office. He demanded a lot of the people who worked for him. I’m sure Steve wasn’t the easiest person to work for, but what a fascinating person to work for.

Great photography, great text. The photos look even better in the printed version of that article which appeared in TIME Europe’s October 17 issue.

(via 512 Pixels)

Note: I wouldn’t call this a “Minimalist Workspace” as Stephen Hackett did. This is what minimalist workspaces look like.

Caschy:

Google veröffentlicht mit dem “Google Zeitgeist 2011″ die populärsten Suchbegriffe des Jahres und zeigt, welche Begriffe und Themen im Trend lagen. Das Ganze hat man in ein Video gepackt, welches natürlich nicht das ganze Jahr 2011 visualisiert, sondern einige Großereignisse. Ich selber bin eigentlich nicht so der Typ, der nah am Wasser gebaut ist, doch bei dem Video musste ich teilweise schon ein wenig schlucken – einige Dinge ließen auch mich nicht kalt.

Ein Klick auf das Bild führt zum Video.

Caschy:

Google veröffentlicht mit dem “Google Zeitgeist 2011″ die populärsten Suchbegriffe des Jahres und zeigt, welche Begriffe und Themen im Trend lagen. Das Ganze hat man in ein Video gepackt, welches natürlich nicht das ganze Jahr 2011 visualisiert, sondern einige Großereignisse. Ich selber bin eigentlich nicht so der Typ, der nah am Wasser gebaut ist, doch bei dem Video musste ich teilweise schon ein wenig schlucken – einige Dinge ließen auch mich nicht kalt.

Ein Klick auf das Bild führt zum Video.

Steve Jobs, 2005:

When I was young, there was an amazing publication called The Whole Earth Catalog, which was one of the bibles of my generation. […] This was in the late 1960’s, before personal computers and desktop publishing, so it was all made with typewriters, scissors, and polaroid cameras. It was sort of like Google in paperback form, 35 years before Google came along: it was idealistic, and overflowing with neat tools and great notions.
Stewart and his team put out several issues of The Whole Earth Catalog, and then when it had run its course, they put out a final issue. […] On the back cover of their final issue was a photograph of an early morning country road, the kind you might find yourself hitchhiking on if you were so adventurous. Beneath it were the words: “Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.” It was their farewell message as they signed off. Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish. And I have always wished that for myself. […]
Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.

Steve Jobs, 2005:

When I was young, there was an amazing publication called The Whole Earth Catalog, which was one of the bibles of my generation. […] This was in the late 1960’s, before personal computers and desktop publishing, so it was all made with typewriters, scissors, and polaroid cameras. It was sort of like Google in paperback form, 35 years before Google came along: it was idealistic, and overflowing with neat tools and great notions.

Stewart and his team put out several issues of The Whole Earth Catalog, and then when it had run its course, they put out a final issue. […] On the back cover of their final issue was a photograph of an early morning country road, the kind you might find yourself hitchhiking on if you were so adventurous. Beneath it were the words: “Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.” It was their farewell message as they signed off. Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish. And I have always wished that for myself. […]

Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.

(Source: sachinteng)